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​russia Got belarusian Furnaces to Produce Engines for T-72B3 and T-90M Tanks

2053
​russia Got belarusian Furnaces to Produce Engines for T-72B3 and T-90M Tanks

Although this example is niche, it illustrates the extent of russia's technological dependence on the rest of the world

A new ion nitriding manufacturing cell has been opened at the Chelyabinsk Tractor Plant–Uraltrac (ChTZ-Uraltrac). The new specialized area will give a multifold increase in mass production of diesel engines.

The launch of this cell was part of the project aiming to modernize the machinery used at ChTZ-Uraltrac and thus increase the volumes of V-92S2 engines produced for T-72B3 and T-90M Proryv main battle tanks, russian military media note.

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Chelyabinsk Tractor Plant–Uraltrac industrial plant, russia
Chelyabinsk Tractor Plant–Uraltrac industrial plant, russia / Archive photo

According to russian sources, the nitriding furnaces for the new production area were made in belarus.

From now on, ChTZ-Uraltrac will be mastering the new technology and figuring out the operating modes of these furnaces, and only after this period of familiarization, the real manufacture will start at the new cell in serial production mode, and V-92S2 engines will begin to come out.

New ion nitriding equipment at ChTZ-Uraltrac
New ion nitriding equipment at ChTZ-Uraltrac / Photo source: 1obl.ru. Credit: Militarnyi

On the part of Defense Express, despite this being only a local, niche example, i.e. it affects only one of the stages of tanks production in russia, it is nonetheless illustrative in a way that it demonstrates the technological reliance of the russian federation on its satellite states.

Earlier in April we touched upon the V-92S2 engine production in russia. Particularly, explained why russians steal these engines from each other and what unusual applications they find for them.

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